Tuesday, March 31, 2015

25 Stories About Work - Days Gone By

I was recently on a plane doodling and thought of some funny / interesting stories from 25+ years of working and traveling. So I decided to write them up as short, random chapters of a non-book with the title of this post. Hope you enjoy them and / or find them interesting. Certainly the value will be at least equal to the marginal cost of the book (zero)...

The USA, early 1990's to early 2000's

For over ten years I traveled mostly five days a week.  Back then we flew out on Sunday night so that we could be on site Monday morning at 8am, and we left the job site on Friday after 5pm which meant that typically I'd get home in the wee hours of the morning on Friday, since often we had to drive for hours to get to the airport before we could even fly home.

Those years are a blur.  I joined the work force during a recession in 1990 and everyone was happy to have a job; no one was complaining.  Right as the dot-com boom ended in about 2001 we had changed our ways and most of the team was flying out Monday morning and leaving on Thursday and "worked from home" on Fridays.  This was viewed as "the good life".

However, for most of those years, life was a blur of travel, packing, unpacking, and working.  It would likely be impossible to motivate staff to work and travel like that nowadays; back then no one thought anything of it and we really didn't even complain as people got divorced and their personal lives crumbled into dust.

Going into the workplace in 1990 there were three things that you could count on:

  1. You were going to work all the time, very hard
  2. You were likely going to work for a bad boss who would drive you with a whip
  3. Often times everyone would go out and have some drinks and a good time
With these expectations, it was hard to be disappointed.  We worked all the time and then we went out for dinner and drinks and then got up the next day and did it over and over again.  From our perspective, this was the way it always had been and the way that it always would be.  These sorts of expectations are built into the name of our blog "Life in the Great Midwest" and it sums up the world view and baseline of our careers.

Certainly people washed out from this insane grind.  It was mostly a male-dominated profession, although there were a few women consultants and auditors who mostly found roles where they were able to minimize their travel.  This was a zero sum game, however - since they took the roles that didn't involve much traveling, often you had to travel that much more.  Someone had to service all of the clients and many of them were located in cities with few local staff, and those local staff often didn't have the skills that the client needed.  Thus the same road warriors showed up and did the work, and every year a few more of them fell off the team due to family reasons (or they just "wised up") but were always replaced by new fresh faced kids eager to earn what seemed to be top dollar or a wizened ex-corporate type needing to make more money.  The kids often worked out but the older ones didn't; it was difficult to adjust to a life of heavy travel midway through your career.

The consulting firms went public - the biggest one was Accenture, but all the big names (with a few exceptions like McKinsey and BCG) eventually monetized and to some extent it was like the silicon valley of that era.  Many got rich and I had the opportunity to participate in a couple of the smaller ones but ended up taking the choice that didn't lead to my own riches; but that's my own (bad) luck.

Consulting and auditing pale in comparison to investment banking; I never have seen people that put in more hours than investment bankers.  I have no idea how they do it; a couple of years ago I went out for dinner and a couple drinks with a good friend of mine who is an investment banker in his 40's and afterwards he went back to his hotel room and worked for a few more hours on a "pitch deck" for a client meeting the next day.  Whether it is practical work or not isn't for me to judge; but as a long term "road warrior" I can tip my hat to them as being completely off their rocker in terms of how much time they are willing to invest in a client.

Perhaps the new "road warriors" are the Silicon Valley start up people.  I have been at a few of their companies and I can see the drive and stamina oozing from their pores as they stare at their computer screens working to make their riches.  They are a bunch of young men as I was once right out of college as an auditor and they are hurling themselves into their careers and trying to make the immense riches of stock options and to be part of something great.  I'm sure that there are many women in there but the vast majority of the staff are men and they are attacking these opportunities like we used to as consultants.

Cross posted at Chicago Boyz

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